gene-cell-therapy

Gene Therapy is the transfer of genetic material (gene transfer) to dysfunctional cells to correct a deficiency in the DNA or genome of a patient. Cell Therapy, such as stem cell therapy, can also be used to achieve these goals. These approaches can be applied to genetic disorders as well as diseases acquired over the lifetime of an individual, such as cancer or infection, to confer a specific property to the cell allowing it to combat the disease.

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Gene Therapy in the News

  • A risk gene for dyslexia is associated with impairments in visual motion detection, according to a study. Mutations in the gene DCDC2 have previously been associated with dyslexia, and this study found that dyslexics with an altered copy of the gene are unable to detect certain types of visual motion.

  • A cluster of defined, non-coding RNAs are mechanistically involved in endocrine therapy resistance in human breast cancer cells, new research has revealed. Furthermore, resveratrol, a kind of polyphenol, was found to repress these RNAs and inhibit the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells which had acquired resistance.

  • Researchers have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin -- a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders. The new genome editing technique introduces a beneficial, naturally occurring genetic mutation into the cells to switch on a gene that is turned off in most people after birth.

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© 2012 Gene Therapy Review. All Rights Reserved. ISSN (print) 1792-0094, ISSN (online) 1792-0108